Foursomes

In a team of 2, players will hit alternate shots until the hole is finished.
Player 1 hits the tee shot, player 2 hits the next shot, player 1 the next and so on. On the next hole, player 2 hits the tee shot, player 1 the next, etc.
In effect, one player will tee off on the even holes and one player will tee off on the odd numbered holes, which is why this format is also known as Odds & Evens.

Matchplay:

Take Team A and Team B and first add the handicaps of both golfers on each side. For example, say Team A’s combined handicap is 15 and Team B’s is 30. Subtract the lower handicap total from the higher one.

In this example, that would be 15 (30-15). Then, divide that total by two (7.5). This rounds up to eight meaning Team A must give Team B eight shots.

Strokeplay:

Handicap allowance is 50% of the partners’ combined course handicaps. So, add the course handicaps together and divide by half.

 

Greensomes

It’s very similar to foursomes. The only difference is that both players hit a tee shot. The best tee shot is then selected, and alternate shot is played until the completion of the hole.

Note: Whoever’s tee shot is chosen, the other team member will hit the second shot.

Many people consider greensomes to be more fun than Foursomes because everyone gets to hit a tee shot on every hole, rather than deciding which golfer will drives on the even and odd numbered holes.

To calculate a handicap in Greensomes, the Council of National Golf Unions (CONGU) recommends it should be 0.6 of the lower player’s handicap and 0.4 of the higher players. If both handicaps are equal, it should be half the combined total.

So, if Team One’s handicaps are four and eight and Team Two’s six and 11, the number of shots given to Team Two would be worked out as follows:

Team One: (0.6 x 4) and (0.4 x 8) = 2.4 + 3.2 = 5.6

Team Two: (0.6 x 6) and (0.4 x 11) = 3.6 + 4.4 = 8

The difference is 2.4 so, rounding down, Team One would give Team Two two shots.